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(Courtesy Dean Otto) Dean Otto; Will Huffman, left, the driver of the truck; and Dr. Matt McGirt, the surgeon, participated in the Napa Half Marathon to celebrate Otto's rehabilitation.(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) -- Dean Otto of Charlotte, North Carolina, was riding his bike one humid morning in September 2016 when the unimaginable occurred: The husband, father and marathoner was struck by a truck.

His spine was fractured. His pelvis, tailbone and ribs were broken. And he could not feel his legs.

After surgery, Otto's surgeon Dr. Matt McGirt gave him a one percent to two percent chance of ever walking on his own again.

But, after months of grueling physical therapy, Otto was taking his first steps with the help of a walker. Slowly, he picked up speed, eventually climbing stairs and then running.

"As far as my recovery goes, it's been a really long, rough road," he told ABC News Wednesday. "I've worked really hard but I've had a lot of great support from my doctors, my physical therapists as well as my family and friends supporting me."

During Otto's rehabilitation, he was also visited in the hospital by Will Huffman, the driver of the truck. The two became friends.

Otto says that forgiveness had been key to his recovery.

"To be able to forgive Will immediately after the accident has been paramount in my positive attitude, in my recovery from this terrible accident," he said.

Dean Otto's spine was torn in two and dislocated, his doctor said. He also had no movement in his legs. "The odds were stacked against him," his doctor said.

Eventually, Otto invited Huffman and McGirt, with whom he'd formed a friendship as well, to run a half-marathon with him. Neither men had run in years but felt motivated by Otto's perseverance.

On Sept. 24, a year to the day of the accident, the three completed the Napa Half Marathon in California.

"To be able to do that with my doctor Matt McGirt as well as Will Huffman, the guy who was driving the truck that morning on Sept. 24, was fantastic," Otto said.

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Man overcomes paralysis to run half-marathon with his surgeon and the driver who hit him

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- Government attorneys on Wednesday asked a New York federal judge to throw out a lawsuit accusing President Donald Trump of violating the Constitution every time a foreign government patronizes a Trump property.

The government attorneys were responding to a lawsuit filed this year by representatives of hotels and restaurants who say they have suffered damages, along with watchdog group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics and Washington (CREW).

The suit charges that Trump's ongoing ties to Trump-branded businesses worldwide is in violation of the so-called emoluments clause, which prohibits federal employees from accepting "any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State.” An emolument is usually defined as compensation of some kind or an item of value.

George Washington and Thomas Jefferson pursued private business interests when they were president, Justice Department attorneys argued before Judge George B. Daniels, saying that Trump is no different. When foreign governments book rooms in Trump hotels, they said, it is not an emolument.

Daniels challenged the Justice Department’s narrow definition of “emolument” and said that if a foreign entity “expects something” in exchange for a payment, that would be an emolument, not a gift, even if the president did not follow through on a presumed quid pro quo. The judge asked the parties if the president is automatically prohibited from selling goods and services at fair market value to a foreign government, a seemingly open legal question.

He then pressed the plaintiffs over their arguments for what's known in the legal world as standing, or their right to sue.

The plaintiffs argued, for example, that there are four midtown Manhattan restaurants with two Michelin stars, excluding sushi restaurants. One is Trump’s Jean Georges, and that’s where foreign delegations want to host their parties. The “universe is small” and Trump properties “are in direct competition with plaintiffs,” they claimed.

Daniels shot back that the emoluments clause “is an anti-corruption provision” and “is not intended to protect you from unfair competition.” The judge also suggested that the plaintiffs haven’t shown specific harm, and that the "injury would have to be more accurately characterized."

Lawyers for CREW said their right to sue rests on the “impairment of their resources” in fighting for good governance.

Daniels said he expects to rule on the Justice Department’s motion to dismiss in the next 30 to 60 days. If the case moves forward, the plaintiffs said they will want four to five months for discovery, which could potentially result in the unveiling of some of Trump's unreleased tax returns, before a one week trial. The plaintiffs' attorneys also said they are open to a settlement arrangement with the president if, for example, he agreed to divest or segregate some of his profits.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --  A man suspected of killing three co-workers Wednesday in Maryland was captured in Delaware this evening, officials said.

Radee Labeeb Prince, 37, allegedly shot five people, killing three, at the Advanced Granite Solutions office in Edgewood, Maryland, Wednesday morning.

Prince entered the facility just before 9 a.m. and was an employee there, according to Harford County Sheriff Jeffrey Gahler. Police were on the scene within six minutes of being notified, authorities said.

A single handgun was used in the attack, police said. The identities of the victims have not yet been released.

Officials said Prince fled the scene in a 2008 black GMC Acadia. The car has Delaware license plates.

"There's an individual out there on the loose who committed one of the most heinous acts we've ever seen in our county," Gahler told reporters after the shooting. He confirmed that Prince has a criminal history and said he remained "armed and dangerous."

Prince was also wanted in connection to a separate shooting in Wilmington, Delaware, Gahler said. The shooting was targeted, and Prince allegedly "had beefs" with the victim he shot there, Wilmington Police Chief Robert Tracy said at a press conference Wednesday afternoon.

Wilmington police said they received the first report of a shooting less than two hours after the shooting in Maryland. A person was shot twice — once near his head and once on his body — and is expected to survive, Tracy said.

After the shooting in Wilmington, officers spotted Prince's car, but they lost sight of the vehicle during a brief chase as it was heading north. His car was later found in Newcastle County, Delaware, Wednesday afternoon, police said.

Prince has a long criminal history, with 15 felony convictions and four misdemeanor convictions in Delaware, Tracy said.

In March 2015, Prince was charged in Cecil County with firearm possession with felony conviction as well as three related misdemeanors: possession of a firearm, illegal possession of ammunition and having a handgun in a vehicle, according to court records. It is unclear why the case ended without prosecution three months later.

In February of this year, a man named Philip Siason filed a petition for a peace order against Prince, court documents show. In his account of why he was filing, Siason said that Prince was an employee of his at JPS Marble & Granite in Forest Hill, Maryland, and that he fired Prince for "punching another employee in the face."

"He came back to our business justifying what he did was right because the other guy was saying things he did not like," Siason said in the documents.

Siason said Prince later tried to collect unemployment benefits from the company, but the company told the unemployment agency that Prince was already working for another company. On Feb. 27, Prince "cursed and yelled" at Siason about the unemployment benefits, Siason wrote in the filing.

"I felt very threatened because he is a big guy [and] very aggressive on me," Siason said, adding that while Prince did not injure him, he did "not want to wait."

The order was denied because the court said there was no statutory basis for relief and that Siason could not meet the required burden of proof.

Gahler said Prince targeted the Maryland home improvement business where he was an employee.

"We know he worked here," Gahler said. "He was scheduled to be at work today."

He added, "We think it ties into the relationship here at work. I do believe he's targeting for a specific reason and not general."

Kevin Doyle, 47, told ABC News he was standing next to his work truck in a parking lot next to Advanced Granite Solutions when he saw three employees running out the back of the building with a "look of terror" on their faces.

Two of the Maryland shooting victims were transported to University of Maryland Medical Center and remain in serious condition, Gahler confirmed.

"Everyone shot is in serious condition," he said.

The Harford County Sheriff's Office tweeted a photo of Prince, including his birth date as well as the vehicle's license plate number.

 

SEARCH for SUSPECT:
RADEE LABEEB PRINCE 11/5/79
2008 Black Chevy Acadia DE Tag PC064273
Call 911 if you see the suspect. pic.twitter.com/v8y18FOEUi

— Harford Sheriff (@Harford_Sheriff) October 18, 2017



The tweet warned: "Call 911 if you see the suspect."

Prince is believed to have acted alone.

"We do not believe anybody else is connected to the shooting," Gahler said.

The Harford County Sheriff's Office is working with the FBI to investigate the shooting. An FBI official told ABC News that the agency is treating the incident as "workplace violence" and there are no indications of terrorism at this point in time.

Edgewood is about a 40-minute drive north of Baltimore, and a short distance to the second crime scene in Wilmington.

The close proximity to the crime scene was enough to cause Harford to warn the public that Prince could return quickly.

“He’s mobile," Gahler said. "He could be back here in Harford County in 10 minutes.”

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NETFLIX(LOS ANGELES) -- Netflix has released a behind-the-scenes featurette about Bright, the genre-bending cop drama starring Will Smith and Joel Edgerton

David Ayer, who directed End of Watch and wrote Training Day, calls the shots on the movie, which is basically End of Watch if it was written by J.R.R. Tolkien. 

The series has Smith playing an LAPD cop in a present in which fairies, orcs, and other mythological creatures are real. Edgerton plays Officer Jakoby, the first-ever orc on the police force.

Smith's jaded Officer Ward and his unlikely partner have to trust each other with their lives -- especially when a case has them stumble upon a "massively powerful artifact" -- a real-life magic wand. "It's sort of like a nuclear weapon," Smith says.

Just like its storybook counterpart, the wand grants any wish -- so a group of corrupt cops plots to steal it, trying to get Ward to go along with the murder of his partner in order to do so.

Instead, Ward and Jakoby bail with the wand, setting off a chase for the item that could literally change the world. 

"It's wildly unique," Smith enthuses of the project, which hits Netflix on December 22.

 

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Photo by Allen Kee / ESPN Images(INDIANAPOLIS) -- The Indianapolis Colts will partially shut down quarterback Andrew Luck on Wednesday, General Manager Chris Ballard said, after a setback in his surgically-repaired right shoulder.

"The doctors and the trainers have decided to give him a cortisone shot to kind of take away some of the inflammation that's been happening," Ballard told reporters Wednesday. "He'll continue to rehab. We're just going to shut down the throwing right now to get this thing calmed back down."

Luck underwent surgery on the shoulder in January. He practiced for two days earlier this month, increasing his workload last week, before the setback.

Ballard didn't offer a timeline for when the team expects Luck can return to throwing, but said that the team didn't intend to place Luck on Injured Reserve.

Luck originally hurt the shoulder in Week 3 of 2015. He aggravated the injury in Week 2 of 2016 and missed all of the team's offseason workouts, training camp and preseason games.

In Luck's absence, the team has turned to Jacoby Brissett at quarterback.

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Photo by Dave Rowland/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Burger King released a three-minute video on Tuesday that highlights the prevalence of bullying in society.

The video, filmed at a California location of the fast food chain by hidden camera, shows the results of a social experiment in which a high school junior is bullied in full view of patrons.

The ad is timed to come out during National Bullying Prevention Month. In contrast to the bullying of the teen, Burger King employees are seen "bullying" the brand's Whopper Jr. The video shows what happens, as some patrons are more likely to speak up about a damaged sandwich than the bullying happening in front of them.

Some customers, however, do speak up and offer heartwarming and inspirational messages in the fight against bullying.

The company cites nonprofit organization No Bully, which says that 30 percent of school kids worldwide are bullied each year.

At the end of the video, Burger King urges viewers to "visit NoBully.org to learn how you can take a stand against bullying."

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gorodenkoff/iStock/Thinkstock(ST. PETERSBURG, Russia) -- From their desks in St. Petersburg, Russian Internet trolls at a company with ties to Russian President Vladimir Putin sought to co-opt American civil rights activists and use them to stoke racial tensions and stir political unrest, authorities said.

Congressional investigators tell ABC News that two online groups — BlackMattersUS and BlackFist — were among those used by Russian operators to reach out directly to unwitting individual Americans engaged in political activism and, in this case, encourage them to help organize rallies, train in self-defense and create music videos. In some cases, those activists even received financial support.

This effort, according to authorities, was the brainchild of the Internet Research Agency, the same St. Petersburg-based company identified by members of Congress as a key arm of the larger Russian operation aimed at influencing U.S. elections. That effort, as first reported by the the Russian publication RBC, now appears to be much broader than previously known, moving beyond the virtual world.

The Facebook and Twitter accounts associated with both groups have since been suspended, and ABC News could not reach any of the people identified online as being members of either group. Executives from both social media giants are expected to appear before Congress early next month to discuss steps they are taking to confront Russian efforts to infiltrate their platform, the scope of which is still not fully understood.

“The strategy appears to be a mix of suppressing votes, stoking fear and doing all they can to help their preferred candidate in Donald Trump and tear down Hillary Clinton,” said Rep. Eric Swalwell, a California Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee who has seen Russian social media posts turned over to Congress by Facebook and Twitter.

By piggybacking on the themes of the Black Lives Matter movement, Russian agitators succeeded in convincing people interested in those same social justice causes that this stealthy foreign-backed effort was legitimate.

Ronnie Houston, a hip-hop artist in Ferguson, Missouri, who goes by the name Rough the Ruler, told ABC News that someone claiming to be from BlackMattersUS contacted him on the Facebook-owned photo-sharing platform Instagram in March of 2016 and asked him to record a song for them “about the social issues that were going on.” He produced a short music video featuring video clips from marches, graphics touting the BlackMattersUS website, and lyrics describing police as “assassins” and protesters as “avengers.”

If he had known the group was not rooted in the Black Lives Matter movement, he said, he would not have agreed to record the song.

“No man I wouldn't have done it,” he said. “Wouldn't have done it at all.”

Conrad James, an activist in Raleigh, North Carolina, says he was approached in September 2016 by a woman who claimed to represent BlackMattersUS and asked him to speak at a rally they were hosting in Charlotte. James said more than 600 people turned up.

“They definitely were trying to stir-up trouble,” James said of BlackMattersUS. “Their intent was obviously to have some type of emotionally filled rally where people are adding fuel to the fire that was already happening around Charlotte.”

Nolan Hack, an activist from Los Angeles, said BlackMattersUS asked for his help organizing civil rights rallies last year and he was reimbursed for some of his travel expenses.

He said the notion of a Russia connection “never entered my mind.”

A pair of bloggers whose social media posts and YouTube videos were pushed out from the St. Petersburg troll farm carried the most pointed political messages.

“We, the black people, we stand in one unity” said one post, by a pair of bloggers purporting to be from Atlanta named Williams and Kalvin. “We stand in one to say that Hillary Clinton is not our candidate.”

Federal officials and Facebook executives confirmed to ABC News that the William and Kalvin videos, first reported on by The Daily Beast, originated not in Atlanta, but in Russia. The men in the video appear to speak with a British accent and some investigators believe they may actually be somewhere in Africa, not Atlanta.

This effort doesn’t appear to have stopped after the election. At least six American trainers paid this year by a group called BlackFist to offer free self-defense classes around the country, urging people to ““be ready to protect your rights” and to “let them know that Black Power Matters.”

Omewale Adewale, a fitness trainer in Brooklyn, New York, says he was paid $320 via TK to conduct four classes in a month.

“It’s very sneaky,” Adewale told ABC News. “It’s very underhanded.”

Roger McNamee, a venture capitalist and early investor in Facebook, says this effort is evidence of the Russian strategy “to anger both sides of the equation.”

“Classic Russian intelligence techniques of taking the most extreme voices and amplifying them,” he said. “It was the perfect petri dish for this kind of campaign.”

Swalwell said he wants Congress to find a way to address this type of interference without infringing on peoples’ rights.

“Russia was able to use our greatest strength, freedom of speech, and turn it into a weakness,” Swalwell said. “I think we have to find what is that fine line between making sure my mom can post any political opinion that she wants but an organized intelligence service of a foreign country isn't able to weaponize social media.”

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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